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Home2 Suites by Hilton Opens LEED-Certified Property in Baltimore

Wednesday February 19th, 2014 - 9:57AM

ABERDEEN, MD/MCLEAN, VA—Home2 Suites by Hilton has opened its 29th hotel, Home2 Suites by Hilton Baltimore/Aberdeen.

”We are excited to unveil our third property in the greater Baltimore area,” said Bill Duncan, global head, Home2 Suites by Hilton. “This market has proven to be a great fit for our Home2 Suites brand and we felt like Aberdeen was a perfect location for our brand. We are also thrilled to open our second Silver LEED-certified hotel in Maryland, as sustainability is a key focus for the Home2 brand.”

The five-story, 107-suite hotel is located at 20 Newton Road, near the Aberdeen Proving Grounds Base, the Higher Education Center at the Heat Center and the Battelle Eastern Science and Technology Center. Nearby attractions also include Ripken Stadium, Susquehanna State Park and historic Havre de Grace.

Home2 Suites Baltimore/Aberdeen is LEED certified and a Maryland Green Travel Partner. Owned by Aberdeen Hotels Partners, LLC., and managed by Cherry Cove Hospitality, the hotel is committed to environmental practices including waste reduction and energy efficiency. The hotel received the second level of LEED accreditation, due in part to the standard Home2 appointments that the brand incorporates to promote sustainability; these include low-flow showers and faucets, CFL light bulbs, dual-flush toilets, recycled flooring and carpet, saline pools, Energy Star appliances and other materials and surfaces made from recycled products. Home2 hotels also use real dishes, glasses and mugs instead of disposable place settings and the landscaping features indigenous plants, which significantly minimizes water usage and irrigation needs.

Home2 Suites by Hilton Baltimore/Aberdeen also incorporated other features to achieve silver LEED accreditation: an energy model projected to save 32% in annual energy costs; and storm water controls to absorb rainwater back into the ground, rather than running directly into the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem.